Features

Fluorescence Spectroscopy

The way a sample diffracts and scatters light from an incoming laser beam can reveal a lot about it. ProbeDrum gives you a variety of options on how to read this signal to get the most information from your sample. You can easily automate these measurements, for example,  for long-term stability studies or very detailed titration curves.

RALS – simple and sensitive

In right angle scattering (RALS) the detector sits at a 90° angle from the incoming light. This is an easy way to make sure that no stray non-scattered light contaminates the signal and makes for a very sensitive technique. RALS is perhaps the simplest method to monitor a sample for changes in composition in for example stability studies. As long as the particles in the sample scatter isotropically, RALS can also give an accurate reading of the absolute particle size.

Light path diagram showing the placement of light source, sample and detector in Right Angle Light Scattering (RALS)

Light path diagram showing the placement of light source, sample and detector in Right Angle Light Scattering (RALS)

LALS – accuracy

For larger particles, roughly above 15 nm diameter, the scattering intensity begins to become anisotropic, or angle dependent. To keep the readout reliable the RALS signal is complemented with low angle light scattering (LALS), in which the detector is placed very close to the unscattered beam as it exits the sample. By collecting only the forward scattered light the angle dependency can be avoided and this allows for reliable size determination of larger particles.

Light path diagram showing the placement of light source, sample and detector in Low Angle Light Scattering (LALS)

Light path diagram showing the placement of light source, sample and detector in Low Angle Light Scattering (LALS)

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